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Responsible pet ownership
Owning and caring for a companion animal is a big responsibility. In addition to microchipping and registering your pet, there are other responsibilities which are also very important.

The Office of Local Government provides extensive information in relation to responsible pet ownership, which an be accessed here. They also provide a comprehensive Responsible Pet Ownership Education Program for children aged 5-7 years of age.

The program is delivered free of charge to schools across NSW by a dedicated team of pet educators and their suitability-tested dogs, and supported by a comprehensive curriculum and resource package. It focuses on teaching children dog safety, as well as responsible pet ownership.

Identifying your dog
As well as being microchipped, all dogs (except working dogs) must wear a collar and tag when outside their own property. The tag should show the dog's name, as well as your address or telephone number.

If you fail to comply with this requirement, you may be liable for a maximum penalty of $880 or $5,500 for a restricted dog or declared dangerous dog.

Preventing your dog from escaping
You, or the person who is in charge of your dog at the time, must take precautions to ensure that your dog does not escape from the property on which it is kept.

If you fail to comply with this requirement, you may be liable for a maximum penalty of $880 or $5,500 for a restricted dog or declared dangerous dog.

Keeping your dog under control in a public place

When out in public with your dog it must at all times be under the effective control of a competent person. As an example, a small child might not be able to control a large or strong dog, in which case a capable adult should walk the dog.

All dogs must be walked on lead unless in a designated off leash area.

A person is not considered to have a dog under effective control if they have under their control more than four dogs at one time.

If you fail to comply with this requirement, you, or if you are not present, the person in control of your dog, if s/he is aged 16 or over, may be liable for a maximum penalty of $1,100 or $11,000 in the case of a restricted or declared dangerous dog.


Cleaning up after your dog
Doggy doo bag dispensers
Doggy doo bag dispensers
are located at Merricks Park
off-leash area and Allan Bull Reserve.
If your dog defecates in a public place or while on someone else's property, you are responsible for picking up its faeces immediately and disposing of it properly.
Many outlets that sell companion animal products sell pick up bags and implements to hold them in. Alternatively, tie a plastic bag to your dogs leash each time you head out for a walk.

We've installed doggy doo bag dispensers at Merricks Park off leash area as well as Allan Bull Reserve for your convenience.

If you fail to pick up after your dog, you or the person in charge of the dog at the time, may be liable for a maximum penalty of $880.

'No-go zones' for dogs
Dogs are prohibited from certain areas when out in public. These areas include:
  • within 10 metres of a children's play area
  • within 10 metres of food preparation or consumption areas, except cafes or restaurants whose owners permit dogs (not restricted dogs or declared dangerous dogs) in their outdoor dining areas
  • recreation areas where dogs are prohibited
  • public bathing areas where dogs are prohibited
  • school grounds
  • child care centres
  • shopping centres where dogs are prohibited
  • wildlife protection areas.

Identifying your cat
All cats must have some form of identification when in a public place.

Cats born before 1 July 1999 (when the Companion Animals Act 1998 came into force) must be identified with either a microchip or a collar and tag with the cat's name and your address or telephone number on it.

Cats born after 1 July 1999 (when the Companion Animals Act 1998 came into force) do not have to wear a collar and tag with your contact details on it, but must be microchipped and lifetime-registered (unless they are exempt from these requirements).

If you fail to comply with this requirement, you may be liable for a maximum penalty of $880.

Cat control
Although the Companion Animals Act 1998 does not require you to contain your cat on your premises, you should consider doing so for your cat's own safety and for the protection of native wildlife.

You may wish to undertake a voluntary cat curfew, or to contain your cat by keeping it indoors or by building a cat enclosure on your premises.

'No-go zones' for cats
Cats are banned from public areas where food is produced or consumed and from wildlife protection areas.


Singleton Council
PO Box 314 Singleton NSW 2330
Ph: 02 6578 7290